Dr Cain Polidano

Research Fellow

Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research

Contact details:

Phone: +61 3 8344 2102
Fax: +61 3 8344 2111
Email: cainp@unimelb.edu.au


Curriculum Vitae (pdf)

Location:

Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research
Level 5, Faculty of Business and Economics Building, 111 Barry Street, The University of Melbourne


Biography

Since joining the Institute in 2008 while completing his PhD, Cain has produced a substantial body of work using microeconometric methods to answer policy relevant questions in the field of education. His work has included research on the outcomes from combining work and tertiary study, re-engaging early school leavers in education, employment outcomes from completing vocational education and training qualifications for people with disability, labour market impacts of disability onset, outcomes from school vocational courses and explaining the socio-economic gap in school completion rates. Cain's current focus is on evaluating the impacts of the Victorian vocational education and training reforms. Prior to undertaking his PhD, Cain worked as a Senior Research Economist with the Productivity Commission, the Australian Government’s principle independent research and advisory body on microeconomic reform.

Research Interests / Current Projects

Education economics, applied microecometric analysis, youth transition, program evaluation and labour economics.

SSRN Authors Profile

Dr Polidano's SSRN Author Page

Selected Publications / Papers

Polidano, C. and Vu, H. Differential Labour Market Impacts from Disability Onset, Health Economics, forthcoming.
Polidano, C., Tabasso, D. and Tseng, Y. A Second Chance at Education for Early School Leavers, Education Economics, forthcoming.
Polidano, C., Hanel, B. and Buddelmeyer, H. 2013. Explaining the Socio-economic Status School Completion Gap, Education Economics vol. 21(3): 230-47.
Polidano, C. 2013. Impacts of Demand-driven Reforms on access to Vocational Education and Training for People with Disability, Australian Economic Review vol. 46(3):369-378.